US & Canada Toll Free: 888 209 4094 All other Countries: +44 (0)1228 598089

Royal Troon Course Guide

Hole 1 – Seal – 370 yards, par 4

The opening hole runs alongside the sea and is very close to the High Water Mark. It is named after a group of group of rocks which form a reef where the seals regularly bask. Bunkers are situated on the left side of a straight fairway. The green is protected by bunkers on either side and is slightly raised. Click here to see image…

Hole 2 – Black Rock -391 yards, par 4

The fairway on this hole is quite narrow and requires an accurate tee shot as there are bunkers right, left and middle. A helping wind would allow the player to carry the bunkers, otherwise play for the narrow fairway short of them. The green is difficult to hit due to the deep pot bunkers that guard the front. The hole is named after a reef which lies offshore. Click here to see image…

Hole 3 – Gyaws – 379 yards, par 4

This hole is named after an old Scottish word which essentially means drain. There is a burn (Gyaws) which crosses the fairway and an accurate tee shot is needed to fall just short of the burn. There are bunkers down the left so it is best to play to the right. The green is difficult to hold as it slopes from front to back. Click here to see image…

Hole 4 – Dunure – 560 yards, par 5

This long par 5 is a left to right dog-leg with a bunker at driving distance on the right to deter cutting the corner for anyone other than the long hitters. The hole has a split level green shts must be kept to the left side of the green to avoid the steep bank on the right.right and left. The hole is named after a local village. Click here to see image…

Hole 5 – Greenan – 210 yards, par 3

One of the most exposed parts of the golf course houses this green which is exposed to any strong cross winds. The green is protected by large bunkers which make it difficult to play for the flag. Shots must be kept to the left side of the green to avoid feeding down to the steep bank on the right. Click here to see image…

Hole 6 – Turnberry – 601 yards, par 5

One of the longest holes in Open Championship Golf, this hole is named after Turnberry Point which can be seen in the distance. An accurate tee shot is needed to avoid the fairway bunkers which start at 250 yards on the left. The green is narrow with bunkers short and to the right and Out of bounds to the rear. Click here to see image…

Hole 7 – Tel-El-Kebir – 405 yards, par 4

Played from a tee perched above the dunes, the fairway is a dog leg left to right. The further you hit the ball, the narrower the fairway becomes. There are bunkers left and right at the corner of the dog-leg. The green is small and broad at the front ,narrowing toward the back.

The hole is named after a battle in 1882. Click here to see image…

Hole 8 – Postage Stamp – 123 yards, par 3

There is a view of the Ailsa Craig Rock Isle from this hole and it was originally called “Ailsa” The hole was renamed when Willie Park compared it to the size of a postage stamp.    Players tee off from High ground over a gully to a small elongated green which is set into the side of a hill on the left. There are 5 deep bunkers that protect the green. This is the shortest hole in Open Championship golf and many players have ruined their card on this hole. Beware. Click here to see image…

Hole 9 – The Monk – 423 yards, par 4

A slight dog-leg left to right, a straightforward tee shot should be played just short of the bunkers on the left which are at 275 yards. There are numerous humps and hollows on this fairway and any shot to the right cause view os the green to be blocked by the gorse bushes. There are no bunkers around this green which is two tiered and slightly elevated. Click here to see image…

Hole 10 – Sandhills – 438 yards, par 4

The fairway on this hole is angled to the left and is the first hole which plays back into the prevailing wind. There are no bunkers at all on this hole but the severe gorse on the right can be punishing. The fairway is undulating and the second shot is played uphill to an elevated green.

This hole is named after the Sandhills which are prominent in front of the Championship Tee. Click here to see image…

Hole 11 – Railway – 490 yards, par 4

This hole is named after the railway line, which runs alongside the right hand side and is out of bounds. The railway runs for the full length of the hole and shots that are steered too far left away from the railway are likely to catch the heavy gorse which runs the whole length of the left hand side of the fairway. There is only one bunker on this hole, which is to the front left of the green. Click here to see image…

Hole 12 – The Fox – 431 yards, par 4

This hole is named after a group of foxes that lived here when the area was woodland. The woodland has now almost all gone; however the odd foxes do remain. The hole is a slight dog-leg from left to right with a ridge of rough and gorse on the right. The raised two tier green one bunker short left and one bunker to the right. Click here to see image…

Hole 13 – Burmah – 472 yards, par 4

This hole, named in 1886 after Burmah became a British Colony, usually plays into the teeth of the wind as you turn back toward the clubhouse. The fairway is full of humps and hollows and is very difficult to find, but has no bunkers. The course get increasingly more difficult from this hole in. Click here to see image…

Hole 14 – Alton – 178 yards, par 3

A relatively straightforward hole which is guarded by three bunkers, two to the right and one to the left. The wind is normally in your face when teeing off, which can make club selection difficult. Click here to see image…

Hole 15 – Crosbie – 483 yards, par 4

A straight fairway which is guarded by bunkers left and right. The flat green has a large bank at the front and is sheltered by mounds. Drives from the tee should favour the left hand side of the fairway for a more favourable second shot. Click here to see image…

Hole 16 – Well – 542 yards, par 5

This is the longest hole on the back nine with a flat fairway with not a lot of trouble other than the burn which runs across the fairway at around 283 yards and the heavily bunkered green. As it is a par 5 with not a huge amount of trouble, it is one of the easier holes on the golf course. It is named after a nearby freshwater well. Click here to see image…

Hole 17 – Rabbit – 222 yards, par 3

If the wind is up, this hole can be as much as a driver to the green. A fantastic par 3 which is the hardest on the course. There is one bunker short left and four others guarding the green which is on a plateau and falls away on both sides. Click here to see image…

Hole 18 – Craigend – 457 yards, par 4

Named after an old farm which was demolished at the turn of the century. A straight drive is required here with bunkers on the left starting at 262 yards and a bunker on th right at 307 yards. The green is 38 yards deep and guarded by bunkers short and adjacent to the green. There is also out of bounds at the back. Click here to see image…

Videos of each hole can be found at www.royaltroon.co.uk/courses/old-course

Back to Top