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Prestwick Golf Club Course Guide

Prestwick Golf Club – Birthplace of the Open Championship 1860

Hole 1 – Railway – 345 yards, par 4

This is one of the most famous opening holes in golf with an out-of-bounds wall running down the right-hand side from tee to green. You need to hit 160 yards to reach the fairway. Around 200 yards will leave a short iron to the green, favour the right side of the fairway for an easier second shot. Click here to see image…

Hole 2 – Tunnel – 164 yards, par 3

Named after the tunnel running under the railway line, this hole plays to one of the original greens of the 12-hole course laid out in 1851. The slightly elevated tee makes the hole play a little shorter but be warned; deep bunkers surround the green. The centre of the green should be your target. Click here to see image…

Hole 3 – Cardinal – 477 yards, par 5

This is one of golf’s classic holes and the fourth on the original 12-hole course. With a sharp dog leg to the right, the sensible play is to lay up short of the Cardinal Bunker 230 yards from the tee. Favour the right side of the fairway to reduce the angle and shorten the hole. Strong players can take on the green directly others should hit over the vast and deep bunker to leave around 100 yards to the green. The Pow burn is out of bounds its entire length. Click here to see image…

Hole 4 – Bridge – 384 yards, par 4

Perhaps the ultimate risk and reward hole. An accurate tee shot is crucial to avoid the fairway bunkers while keeping your tee shot right shortens the hole making an easier approach to the green. The fairway slopes left to right towards the Pow burn, which is out of bounds, as does the green which is protected by a well-placed greenside bunker. Take these contours into consideration. Click here to see image…

Hole 5 – Himalayas – 206 yards, par 3

The world famous blind par three. It is crucial to aim at the disc on the hill that matches the tee you are playing from, and make sure you take enough club to match the distance. It is a testing shot especially as the prevailing winds will push you towards five bunkers on the left side of the green. The green slopes back to front, so leaving it short will give you an uphill putt. The tee box will show where the hole is cut. Please ring the bell when you’re finished to let those behind know it’s safe to tee off. Click here to see image…

Hole 6 – Elysian Fields 362 yards, par 4

The start of the area known as the Elysian Fields (holes six to nine). A tee shot favouring the left side of the fairway leaves the ideal angle for the second shot to a protected green. Anything short or left will kick across the green towards the deep bunker on the left, so it’s vital you take enough club to land on the putting surface. Click here to see image…

Hole 7 – Monkton Miln – 430 yards, par 4

A demanding tee shot that ideally requires a draw to stay away from three hidden fairway bunkers lurking on the right. The second shot is uphill over two hidden fairway bunkers waiting to gather any mishit shots. Take this into account when selecting your club. A par is always welcomed. Click here to see image…

Hole 8 – End – 432 yards, par 4

This hole takes you to the furthest point from the clubhouse. Favouring the right side with your tee shot will need to carry 225 yards to avoid the last bunker. The approach shot always looks shorter than it is; trust the yardage and for the best birdie opportunity leave the ball under the hole for an uphill putt. Click here to see image…

Hole 9 – Eglington – 444 yards, par 4

A very demanding par four. On finding the fairway, you are faced with a semi-blind approach to the green which is likely to be more than 200 yards so aim marginally left of the marker pole as the green slopes from left to right. Take care; this hole deserves all your respect. The hole is named after the club’s first captain, the Earl of Eglinton. Click here to see image…

Hole 10 – Arran – 453 yards, par 4

With spectacular views of the Isle of Arran, the key to this hole is missing the first three fairway bunkers from the tee. From here you are faced with an uphill approach so make sure you take enough club. If you miss the fairway, be careful with your second shot as the second group of bunkers have strange attraction for golf balls. Click here to see image…

Hole 11 – Carrick – 195 yards, par 3

The prevailing wind pushes from right to left so take this into consideration when teeing up to avoid the four bunkers on the left and two hidden bunkers on the right. The green slopes right to left. Click here to see image…

Hole 12 – Wall -513 yards, par 5

A narrow tee shot with the fairway sloping right to left bringing bunkers into the play. The longer players may take on the green in two but even those laying up will need to do so with caution with six bunkers waiting. The green slopes heavily from right to left so allow for a bit of movement once the ball reaches the green. If you’re playing into the wind, our caddies joke about visitors reaching it with “a driver, three-wood and a taxi”. Click here to see image…

Hole 13 – Sea Headrig – 458 yards, par 4

Regardless of the weather, a par will feel like a birdie. An undulating fairway will probably leave you with an uneven stance and the green doesn’t lend itself to the traditional run ups associated with links golf. Great precision is required if you are to tame this hole and avoid Willie Campbell’s Grave; a hidden bunker on the left side of the fairway. You will need to hit your tee shot 265 yards from the back tee to carry it. Sea Headrig was originally the 5th hole on the 12-hole course. Click here to see image…

Hole 14 – Goosedubs – 363 yards, par 4

A dub is Scots for a pond or puddle – the area to the left of the fairway used to flood giving the hole its name. There is a generous landing area off the tee which should leave a mid-to-short iron approach to a well-protected green. On finding the green, you should have a fairly straightforward putt on this relatively flat putting surface. Click here to see image…

Hole 15 – Narrows – 353 yards, par 4

The most demanding tee shot on the course, the ideal line is to carry 210 yards down the left side of the path. Anything slightly mishit may find the bunker hidden over the brow of the hill. From the fairway you should see the top of the pin giving you a target. The green slopes severely from front left to back right meaning two putts will be well earned. Click here to see image…

Hole 16 – Cardinals Back – 290 yards, par 4

Stronger players may fancy driving this green but with reward comes great risk. The enormous Cardinal bunker will gather anything short and right. Others may favour the left side leaving a short approach to a two-tiered green sloping front to back, but watch out for Willie Campbell’s Grave which splits the fairways and requires a carry of 225 yards. Two pot bunkers at the back of the green await any over hit shots. Click here to see image…

Hole 17 – Alps – 394 yards, par 4

This is the original 2nd hole from 1851 and the oldest existing hole in championship golf. The narrow fairway requires an accurate tee shot to allow the best chance of reaching the green in two. The blind second shot plays every inch of the yardage. Falling short will mean playing from the famous Sahara bunker. Check the tee box as this will indicate pin positions that you can then correspond to the markers on top of the Alps. Please ring the bell on leaving this green to tell the players behind it is safe to play. Click here to see image…

Hole 18 – Clock – 288 yards, par 4

A gentle par four with a generous green provides a brilliant chance to end the round with a birdie. Aim for the clock on the clubhouse with your tee shot. Many may drive the green but don’t try to cut off too much of the ridge. It is important to allow for the break as this green slopes from left to right and is regularly under read. Click here to see image…

 

6,551 yards – Par 71

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